Loughton County High School for Girls
Copyright © 2016 by Susan Capes  ·  All Rights reserved  ·  E-Mail: sue@loughtonchs.co.uk
Back
to top
 
The School Day
 
School Reports
First Year 1967
These first 8 reports are part of a bundle of paperwork, including 17 reports in total, generously given to me after a house clearance. They belonged to Mrs Doreen Smith, née Tautz. LHS 1932 - 1937
They show the signatures of Miss Hall, Miss Verini and Winifred Darch amongst others.
Interesting that Doreen had to repeat the year in Class III Upper. This is recommended at the bottom of picture 2 and reflected in the following reports with her age a year older than her classmates.
I have added one of my reports to highlight the differences over 30 years. Note that Mr (Dr) Bourne and I did not get on well - I was happiest in music classes. Francesca Brown has very bravely sent me several of her reports
If anyone else is brave enough to expose their report(s) to public scrutiny I'd love to receive them! (Thank you Francesca)
Timetables

Reports

Lessons

Odds & Ends

Classroom Howlers

Girl Guides

Prize-Giving Programme
Fifth Form Timetable 1974/5
Fifth Form Timetable 1974/5
Timetables
 
Back to Top
Back to Top
Janette Robinson (LHS 1967 - 1974) told me:
I remember that on Monday mornings we used to trek to the (then) newly opened swimming baths for lessons, and that there was no homework for first years on a Wednesday.
This timetable will enlarge when clicked and will enlarge further if you click the top right hand corner
In the 60s and 70s the school day started at 8.30 when everyone arrived, hung up coats, dumped books and bags in their form room and waited for assembly.
please email me with your memories of the school day
Lessons
 
Things We Hear - howlers from the classroom
1928

In 1703 it seemed unlikely that William and Mary would  have any more children.
(Mary died in 1694-William in 1702).

The Pilgrim Fathers sailed in 1855 and founded Virginia, which they named after the maidens they had left behind them.

The liver is a stiff rod with one fixed point.

When the waters had covered everything they sat down on a dry space.

Wat Tyler's daughter had a ride in a poll-taxi, and could not pay the driver.

I stood tiptoe on a little hill by Keats on page four. (A clear case for punctuation).

Someone could not come to a gala at a quarter to five because there was no train as early as that.

Damp rubbish is burnt in an insinuator.

We must adjust our floating according to the position of our centre of gravity.

There were four Girl Guides, unmarked, in the neatness cupboard.

Jam grows in large quantities in Cambridgeshire.

Vermin is a useful colour for painting.

Defeated means having one's feet cut off


1929

Sir Christopher Wren re-built the statue of the great St. Paul.

The great wall of China was built to keep back the fierce Scots.

Abraham's servant prayed to God to send the "Wright" girl.

Charles Lamb wrote the Canterbury Tales.

"Barrows" are to carry stuff in (Barrows are prehistoric places of burial).

Horatius defended the bridge across the River Ouse at Dover.

The feminine of cheval is belle-mare.

Shakespeare was born at Leyton-on-Sea in the reign of Queen Victoria.

Pompus Pilot was Roman Governor of Jerusalem.

A reason for the decadence of the Persian Empire :- The Persians adopted a new form of mortality and became idol.

Jacob saw a ladder stretching from earth to heaven. There were angels going up and down it, carrying prayers up and answers down.

Peter fell into a trance, a kind of pit.

An arsenal is a kind of football. John Bull went round England, stirring up the Peasants' Revolt.

The conjugation was large and numbered 2,390.


1930

THE English ships drove the Armada right round the North Pole.

The Imperial Institute is the headquarters of the Imps.

William II. refused to allow Anselm to go to the Pope for his Palladium.

While his wife was alive Milton wrote "Paradise Lost."

However, after her death he wrote "Paradise Regained."

When he wrote the "Ode to Dejection" Coleridge was sitting musing and mending his child.

If hot irons are put into the hair the result is a heat wave.

The acrostics of the New Hall are excellent.

The law of gravitation happens when gravel is thrown up in the air and falls to the ground.

The pores on a leaf are called tomatoes.

A veteran is a man who looks after dogs when they are ill.

A pontiff is a kind of dog.

James I. had a deficit in his speech.


1931

The Whigs maintained their power in England through their control of rocket and pocket boroughs and of rocking and pocket boroughs.

Destitution is where you go at the end of a journey.

The wise men brought gold, frankincense and mirth.

A dervish is a scrap between two enemies. Wolsey and Arpeggio were the chief members of the Decretal Commission.

A triangle is a three-sided obstacle like three acute angles of 90 degrees together.

In the thirteenth century the Mongrels invaded China.

A request at lunch : "May I sit next to my sister We are in the same lunch tin?"


1933


Agnovitque per umbras.   He recognised the lamb under the umbrellas.

A cineraria is a thing that rubbish is burnt in.

A wolf found Romulus and Remus and brought them up as wolf cubs.

Matthew was a taxi-collector.

The Whigs and Tourists invited William of Orange to rule England.

Samuel took a lamb and offered it as a burnt sacrifice woolly to the Lord.

The L.N.E.R. tries to help the fishing industry by advertising C.O.D. by rail.


1934

Concentric is a man who concentrated.

Meaning of “permanent”; Her hair was permanent, not real.  They had a permanent maid and she stayed five weeks.

A monogram is a kind of aeroplane.

An epithet is an adjective made from an epitaph.

The gist is the chief part of the human body.

Christendom means he had water over him.

A Knight errant is one who stands outside the castle all night.

A centenarian is one who has charge of a hundred soldiers.

Diffidence is the result when you divide.

The Russian serviette has spread over the Far East.

AT Sports:
“What race is this, dear?”   “This is the one for the parents under twelve.”

Nous étions sur la plage:    We were living in the time of the plague.




1935


Each manor had a neatness cupboard for animals which was called a pound.

The ark was a house-boat.

On the ground floor of a Norman castle there were no windows

Peter the Hermit rode on an holy ass, scantily clad and wearing a large crucifix.

A chancellor is a man who typewrites letters.

The Prince of Whales is heir to the throne of England; The Dolphin was the heir to the throne of France.

It is dangerous to move a patient with a fracture because the fracture can always break another bone and when it is a backbone it can choke the patient.

Julius Caesar was the first Englishman to sail to America.

An R.S.V.P. Book will tell you all about how not to be cruel to animals.

In Greek houses there were no conveniences; there was no plumage and no drainage.

“Apercevoir” means “to knowtess.”

An interesting fact about Wolsey; there are socks named after him.

Meaning of “maritime”: Love affairs.


1936

Zacharias went into the church to burn insects.

On Indian temples there were many minuets.
Robert Walpole sat in Parliament for a rotten burrow.

A gladiator is a kind of crocodile

He went up into the stratagem in a balloon

The Wise men brought gold and myrrh and frankenstein

His pellet was so dry that he could not speak a word

It taciturned out to be a frog


1938


The worm is a terrestrial vertebrate

Some of the mountains of the Andes are alive, and they run along the west coast of South America.

The angles of this hexagon are all asleep.

The wool on a sheep’s back fluctuates.

The stick insect is so called because it is sticky, and the stickyness enables it to stick to plants.

There are three kinds of forest - considuous, equitorial, piniferous


Others (from odd pages from the magazines)

Having many wives is called polygamy, having one is called monotony

A skeleton is a man with his inside out and his outside off

Solomon had 300 wives and 700 porcupines

Joseph was very upset because an angel told him he was to marry a blessed Virginian

Greenwich is for the Arsenal to play at.

A treacle is a thing for children to ride on; it has three wheels, a saddle and handlebars

Henry VIII and Wolsey lived at Hampton Court where they were fiends together.
Christine recently sent me the ones from the  1928 - 31 magazines which reminded me I was compiling a list - here it is:
Back
to top
Back
to top
Back
to top
 
The following are lists of all Lower 6th classes issued in (I believe) September 1975. They list subjects and days when classes occur together with the initials of the teachers. I have tried to identify the teachers from these but still have gaps - can anyone ID the others?
English:        DH - Dorothy Henderson;  TW - Tania Wolff; 
                      ET - Mrs Thorby;           CC - Mr Cain ;
Sociology:   BPC - Betty Coles;  JD - Mrs Dix ;
Music:          LL - Lois Loynes;  BC - Barbara Caldow;
RE:                BR - Miss Richman
Needlework:    MJ -  Mrs Jackson ?;
History:      BPC - Betty Coles;     SP - Mrs Perkins;
Latin:    MF - Mrs Ferris;      FB -   ??
French:    JU -    ??;     DT -   Mrs Taylor;  JS -  Mrs Speller
German:    AF -  Mrs Furby or Fibbins?;  
Art:     MF - Miss Fisher
Maths:    KD - Mrs Dyson:  BM - ?? ; BB - Beryl Blomfield
Geography  (and Geology):    SL - Miss Leigh; VF - Val Fisher
Home Economics:    PP - ??
Chemistry:    JA - Mr Adams
Physics:     JG - Miss Gadd
Biology:    DS - Diane Singer;  PG - ??
Human Biology:  MS - Miss Speedyman;  (and PG again)
Russian:    MH - Mrs Hodge
Stats:    CE - Christine Eckley
Maths for Physicists:    IG - ?? or is this meant to be JG for Miss Gadd again;
Craft:    ML - ??;  MA - Mrs Abbess ?;
PE:     PS - Pauline Slingerland
Each page will open in a pop-up window and can be enlarged further with a single click
Odds and Ends
 
Back to Top
daily excuse note excuse notes raffle ticket
daily excuse note excuse notes raffle ticket
School Leaving Award inscription School Leaving Award book Old Geometry set
School Leaving Award inscription School Leaving Award book Old Geometry set
label inside geometry set
label inside geometry set
The geometry set had changed to a metal box and plastic set square and protractor by 1965, if not before
Christine sent in some of these photos and remembers that if we got a spelling wrong in our homework we had to write the offending word out three times below our work - so that's how we learned! Others on facebook commented, "A rule vigorously enforced by Miss Leigh", "and Miss Wolff too"
Back
to top
These five images are of books, a geometry set and prefect badge from the late 20s/early 30s and yet I remember my geography book having almost identical drawings as these, including the tracing paper overlay. I think we'd have been reprimanded for the sorry state of the anthology book but I suspect that's more to do with its age!
These have been very kindly sent to me by the daughter of Patricia Wilkins. Patricia joined the school's Girl Guide Company. Some of her photos and badges are here.  There is more information about her on the Sport page here too.
Back
to top
Girl Guides
 
In the early days of the school it had its own Girl Guide Companies.
Miss Cowmeadow was very much involved with Guiding well into the 1960s. She was District Commissioner when I was in the Brownies and I remember going to her house in Church Lane to do my proficiency badges.
Patricia (Pat) Wilkins joined the 2nd Company and went to camp. Here are photos from 1929, 1932 and 1933.
The Guides went to Anglesey - the furthest my Guide Camp went was Witham!
There are also some badges - patrol emblems and proficiency badges as well as star pins - I vaguely remember having pins too - I believe one star meant patrol second and two for patrol leader. Please correct me if I'm wrong.
Click this link to see some of Pat's school books and this one for some more information about her together with her sporting badges
Miss Silvester and Miss Cowmeadow 1929 Pat Wilkins cooking and eating! 1929 Pat is far left in the front row
Miss Silvester and Miss Cowmeadow 1929 Pat Wilkins cooking and eating! 1929 Pat is far left in the front row
1932 Anglesey 1933 A prolific proficiency!
1932 Anglesey 1933 A prolific proficiency!
A bit of online research helped with the badges!
Presentation of Prizes programme from December 1984
The photos will enlarge into a gallery and can be further enlarged - top R hand corner
Thanks to Paula Carter for sending these. Paula is listed in Fifth Form Certificates on the last page.
 
Back
to top